Posts made in May, 2015

My Wobbly Bicycle, 98

Posted by on May 24, 2015 in Archive | 34 comments

My Wobbly Bicycle, 98

I am at the Lutheran Home in Missouri for this week, looking after my father (he’s 97, as you know) who has just had a leg amputated above the knee. He had an aneurism that shut off the blood supply, so nothing else could be done. Interestingly, he was constantly wishing he could die before this, but now he seems energized, willing to do the hard work of building back enough strength to get out of bed and into the wheelchair, onto the toilet. I think mainly it’s the stimulus of having so many family members rally to his side. I think it’s the attention of the pretty young PT women, who...

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My Wobbly Bicycle, 97

Posted by on May 12, 2015 in Archive | 15 comments

My Wobbly Bicycle, 97

Thought you’d like to know how things are here, those of you who are following. My sister and I have been at the hospital a week now. My father has had his right leg amputated above the knee. When the doctor came in on Friday, the leg looked better. We were still in the decision-making stage. “Let him have the weekend to recuperate, and we can decide on Monday,” said the doctor. But by Saturday, the leg was yellow, black on the bottom of the foot, and so swollen that the skin was stretched tight. The pain was increasing. His urine was beginning to show signs of toxicity. To leave...

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My Wobbly Bicycle, 96

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in Archive | 18 comments

My Wobbly Bicycle, 96

I am sitting in the CTU unit, in my father’s room, with my son Scott and my sister Michelle. My father’s sitting up in bed, talking on the phone to my nephew David. We have to make a decision soon—should my 97 year old father have his leg amputated—no one has statistics for survival of people this age. The alternative is to let the leg rot, to die slowly, as the leg—which is “not viable,” says the surgeon, goes bad and then the kidneys and liver go. Shall he spend his last days trying to recuperate from leg amputation, with the concomitant pain and emotional distress (the...

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