Posts made in March, 2015

My Wobbly Bicycle, 93

Posted by on Mar 25, 2015 in Archive | 7 comments

My Wobbly Bicycle, 93

What I want to say is, the Wobbly Bicycle never quits wobbling. I’m reading an essay by Bruce Bond in Kenyon Review, called “Zeno’s Arrow, Cupid’s Bow: Structure, Process, and Poetry’s Dream of a Unified Field.” If the title hasn’t already scared you off, then perhaps you can handle the epigraph: “It’s easy to be mysterious about mystery. The difficult thing, the beautiful thing, is to be clear about mystery.” –B.H. Fairchild. It’s all mystery. Not knowing, really, if my poems are any good. Not knowing if I’ll stay free from cancer, not knowing what the adult lives...

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My Wobbly Bicycle, 91

Posted by on Mar 11, 2015 in Archive | 3 comments

My Wobbly Bicycle, 91

Every time I begin to write about my father, I struggle to avoid allowing the situation to sound too normal. As in, oh yes, how hard it is to move one’s parent into Assisted Living. Yes, but. This situation is unusual. Always has been. My father’s somewhere on the autism spectrum. Furthermore, and to compound things, he’s bright as hell. He’s 97 next month, losing his memory gradually, but can recite the generic names of the ten or so medications he’s taking. He can go on about Malthus, Einstein, and the Federal Reserve System. No matter that what he says is usually a repeat,...

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Guest Wobbly from My Sister

Posted by on Mar 4, 2015 in Archive | 11 comments

Guest Wobbly from My Sister

Last week I wrote about my sister’s going to Missouri, helping move our father from Independent Living to Assisted Living. This week Jerry and I are in Missouri helping to finish the move, cleaning the last from the “cottage,” organizing files, getting tax documents ready, etc. My sister Michelle has written a guest blog post for this week: Musings on the Significance of Stuff Five years ago my sister and I cleaned out my parents’ house, in which they had lived for 47 years. Staying in any place for that long carries a high risk of stuff accumulation. In fact, anyone...

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